The Science & Technology
of Glass
Cambridge - Monday 4th to
Wednesday 6th September 2017



Wei Deng
<wei.deng@shu.ac.uk>

article posted 21 June 2017

Dr Wei Deng joined Dr Paul Bingham’s research group in Sheffield Hallam University as Postdoctoral Research Fellow in 2016. Wei's current research project is Briquetting of recycled glass fines for energy and CO2 reduction in the glass industry.


Briquetting of recycled glass fine particles for container glass batch
Wei Deng1,*, Richard Wright2, Chris Boden-Hook2 and Paul A Bingham1

It is well known that the introduction of recycled glass (cullet) can significantly reduce glass melting energy requirements and CO2 emissions. Cullet can act as a fluxing agent and decreases the melting energy. Compared to regular glass batch, the melting energy consumption of cullet is around 70-75 %. However, recycled cullet fine particles cannot be directly introduced in glass batch. In the glass industry, there is a strict requirement on the particle size distribution of batch components. Specifically, very small particles of glass batch will cause dust in furnace, have corrosive effects on the refractory bricks and block the checker in regenerator. They can also cause foaming of the melt in the furnace. Every year, about 20% recycled cullet is rejected and sent to landfill. If the rejected cullet fines could be reclaimed as batch by a certain process, the growing shortage of landfill sites and quality recycled cullet supply for glass plants could be alleviated. In this research, a fixed formula glass fine briquette was manufactured with appropriate additions and water. To keep the strength of briquette, sodium silicate was added as binder; The properties of briquette were investigated for suitable sitting time. A typical industry bottle glass batch composition was chosen as a baseline in this study. With compensation of the batch to keep final glass composition consistent, different amounts of briquettes were added. Finally, the colour and redox status of glass were also investigated.






Fig. 1 Optical microscope photograph of recycled glass fines.









Fig.2 Optical microscope photograph of briquette cross-section.






Institutions:

1Materials and Engineering Research Institute Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK 2Wright Engineering Ltd, Blyth Road, Worksop S81 8BP, UK