Stained Glass - Art at the Glass Surface
Cambridge - Monday 4th and
Tuesday 5th September 2017



Sara Louro
<s.louro@campus.fct.unl.pt>

article posted 17 May 2017

Sara Louro finished her Bachelor’s degree in Conservation and Restoration at the Faculty of Sciences and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal in 2015.

During her Bachelor’s, in 2014, she participated in a month long internship, in the reservation of the Sport Lisboa e Benfica team in Lisbon. She also joined an internship in the summer of 2015, for a month, at the church of Santa Maria da Graça, Monforte, Portugal.

In 2015 she entered the Master’s program in Conservation and Restoration at the Faculty of Sciences and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal and is currently finishing her Master’s degree in the field of stained glass, on the thesis “Stained glass paints: Grisaille and Yellow stain”.


Stained glass paints: Grisaille and Yellow Stain
Sara Louro a*, Márcia Vilarigues a,b, L.C. Alvesc

A stained glass window is considered a decorative ensemble of glasses painted with vitreous paints, framed by metallic cames commonly made of lead [1,2]. The paints used in the decoration of these artistic works are used to produce figures and/or shapes, while allowing the passage of light [3]. The painting materials can be divided into three groups: grisailles, yellow stains and enamels [4].

In order to create and enable the systematization of a spatio-temporal map of the production of paints, that includes particularly grisailles and yellow stains, several sets of samples were analysed, from different provenances and time periods, situated between the 13th and 20th centuries. These samples belong to the private collection of Joost Caen (Belgium), Monastery of Batalha and to Convent of Christ (Portugal).

With the objective of characterizing the chemical composition and morphology of grisailles and yellow stains (historic and reproduced), Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis were done to obtain the compositional information, along with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to analyse the morphology of the layers. The structure of the layers was analysed with an Optical Microscope.

Reference:

[1] P. Redol, O Mosteiro da Batalha e o Vitral em Portugal nos séculos XV e XVI. Batalha: Câmara Municipal da Batalha, 2003.
[2] O. Schalm et al., «Enamels in stained glass windows: Preparation, chemical composition, microstructure and causes of deterioration», Spectrochim. Acta - Part B At. Spectrosc., vol. 64, n. 8, pp. 812–820, 2009.
[3] M. Vilarigues, P. Fernandes, L. C. Alves, e R. C. da Silva, «Stained glasses under the nuclear microprobe: A window into history», Nucl. Instruments Methods Phys. Res. Sect. B Beam Interact. with Mater. Atoms, vol. 267, n. 12–13, pp. 2260–2264, Jun. 2009.
[4] O. Schalm, «Characterization of Paint Layers in Stained Glass Windows», University of Antwerp, 2000.

Institutions:

a Department of Conservation and Restoration, Faculty of Science and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal
b Research Unit VICARTE – Glass and Ceramics for the Arts, Faculty of Science and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal
c C2TN (Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear), IST/UL, Estrada Nacional 10 2695-066 Bobadela, Portugal.