Stained Glass - Art at the Glass Surface
Cambridge - Monday 4th and
Tuesday 5th September 2017



Laura Tempest
<laura.tempest@yorkglazierstrust.org>

article posted 18 May 2017

Laura Tempest MA. Laura completed a BA in English and History of Art at the University of York in 2008 and in 2010 was awarded her MA in Stained Glass Conservation and Heritage Management. From 2011 to 2016 she was University of York research assistant on the HLF-funded conservation of the Great East Window of York Minster. She is currently a Conservator, The York Glaziers Trust: laura.tempest@yorkglazierstrust.org.

Nick Teed, MSc ACR, is Conservation Manager at The York Glaziers Trust. He is an ICON Accredited Conservator, a member of ICOMOS and an Associate Member of the Corpus Vitrearum International Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Stained Glass. Supervision and leadership of the largest team of stained glass conservators in the UK. Employed at YGT since 1999. Visiting tutor in Stained Glass Conservation, University of York. nick.teed@yorkglazierstrust.org

Nancy Georgi MA ACR, Senior Conservator, The York Glaziers Trust. She is an ICON Accredited Conservator, a member of ICOMOS and an Associate Member of the Corpus Vitrearum International Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Stained Glass. Team Leader of Conservation Projects. Employed at YGT since 2011. Visiting tutor in Stained Glass Conservation, University of York. nancy.georgi@googlemail.com


Thomas Jervais and the East Window of Agher Parish Church, County Meath
Laura Tempest*, Nick Teed & Nancy Georgi

The York Glaziers Trust, 6 Deangate, York YO1 7JB

The East Window of Agher Parish Church, County Meath in the Republic of Ireland contains a rare survival of a stained glass window by Dublin born artist Thomas Jervais. The window depicting St Paul preaching to the Athenians (after Raphael) was made in 1770 for the Wellesley family home at Dangan Castle, Summerhill, however it was relocated into the nearby church at Agher following a fire, which led to the abandonment of the house in 1809. Jervais was to relocate to London later in 1770, where he spent the rest of his life and gained celebrity for his association with Sir Joshua Reynolds, for whom he painted the West Window of New College Chapel, Oxford in 1778. Jervais was also to be commissioned as glass painter to King George III in 1780, undertaking the painting of the East Window of St George’s Chapel, Windsor (now destroyed). Conservation of the East Window of Agher by the York Glaziers Trust in 2016 has revealed fascinating new insights into the early work of this artist. Jervais’ approach to glass painting at this stage appears to be experimental and perhaps self taught. Fired paint is complemented by cold paint, multiple layers of glass are used to enhance and intensify tone and colour and evidence has been found for highly unusual applications of silver stain. Jervais appears to have had only a limited range of glasses and materials at his disposal in the making of the window. The glass is predominantly clear, extremely thin and with numerous problematic contortions in its shape, which necessitated a great deal of creativity in its assembly. This paper will highlight the conservation challenges and the technical fabrication of this remarkable window. It will further describe the context of the work of this little known and under-appreciated artist from a chapter of the art history of Ireland that has been to a large degree unwritten and over-shadowed by interest in the Irish artists of the Arts and Crafts movement.